Regarding project "Refactor and Automate Infusion Documentation"

Yash Jipkate yashjipkate at gmail.com
Tue Mar 10 15:40:57 UTC 2020


Seems like the previous mail got sent in plain text mode. Therefore, the
hyperlinks vanished. I am sharing the links below.


   - Archetypes in HUGO <https://gohugo.io/content-management/archetypes/>
   - Angular <https://angular.io/docs> and React
   <https://reactjs.org/docs/getting-started.html> docs
   - Static file management in HUGO
   <https://gohugo.io/content-management/static-files/>


Thanks.
Yash


On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 8:57 PM Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Justin,
>
> I have left some comments inline. Also, I'll be sharing the draft
> proposal soon.
>
> Thanks.
> Yash
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 5:37 PM Justin Obara <obara.justin at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Yash,
> >
> > I’ve left some more comments below.
> >
> > Thanks
> > Justin
> >
> > On Mar 10, 2020, at 2:21 AM, Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Justin,
> >
> > Thanks for the reply. I have responded inline.
> >
> > Also, since the student application period approaches, should I start on
> my draft proposal using HUGO as the SSG? Since I have found it as the best
> alternative till now. If we find any other better alternative, then we can
> switch. But according to me, HUGO is best suited for our needs.
> >
> >
> > This would be up to you. You’re welcome to propose what you think is
> best. You might want to consider adding steps for investigation,
> experimentation and leaving things open to change.
> >
> >
> > Thanks.
> > Yash
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 4:26 AM Justin Obara <obara.justin at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi Yash,
> >>
> >> Some comments inline below.
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >> Justin
> >>
> >> On Mar 9, 2020, at 4:32 PM, Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi Justin,
> >>
> >> Thanks for the reply. I have responded inline.
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >> Yash
> >>
> >>
> >> On Mon, Mar 9, 2020 at 6:51 PM Justin Obara <obara.justin at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Hi Yash,
> >>>
> >>> Somewhere along the line we lost our CC to the fluid-work mailing
> list. I’ve added that back in now so that others can follow along and
> provide input as needed.
> >>>
> >>> Another tool to look at would be https://docusaurus.io. It would be
> good to also investigate if there are other options/solutions that we
> haven’t yet mentioned.
> >>
> >>
> >> A complete list of all the major static site generators can be found at
> StaticGen. The list is sorted on the basis of recent trends in the
> community. Regarding Docusaurus, I found this blog that compares HUGO and
> Docusaurus. There is also this comment in an issue that compares Jekyll,
> Docusaurus, and HUGO. I read the Docusaurus docs and there are some
> advantages that it provides over the other SSGs.
> >>
> >> In-built versioning
> >> Translations
> >> Inbuilt search feature using Algolia.
> >>
> >> To summarize all the findings over the course of this thread, the
> various SSGs and their details are:
> >>
> >> HUGO
> >>
> >> Written in Go, therefore fast build times - countered by the fact that
> Go deprives us of npm packages and build times are not that big a concern
> to us.
> >> The search functionality needs to be manually implemented by the ways
> described here.
> >> Versioning can be realized by the usage of tags - inbuilt provision for
> tag-specific pages.
> >> Various themes to choose from, all cost-free.
> >> Pre-defined convention for best practices.
> >> Vast community support and one of the trending SSGs (according to stars
> on the repo in the past week: source)
> >>
> >> 11ty
> >>
> >> Written in JS, access to npm packages.
> >> No search functionality provided nor any documentation provided on how
> to implement it. Its docs site uses Duck Duck Go search.
> >> Versioning can be done by collections but not as intuitive as HUGO tags
> - no tag-specific pages.
> >> No provision for custom themes, need to start from scratch. Although
> many third-party themes are available. No documentation on using a custom
> theme as in HUGO.
> >> Flexible in terms of conventions.
> >> Good community support.
> >>
> >> Docusaurus
> >>
> >> Written in JS, access to npm packages.
> >> In-built search functionality powered by Algolia.
> >> In-built versioning functionality.
> >> Only one theme available needs to be customized to change. Uses React.
> >> Rigid conventions. Uses React components to render and therefore can
> not modify much in its default way of rendering.
> >>
> >> Absence of page-level variables, and therefore would cause difficulties
> when the SSG metadata is not allowed in the MD files. Not suited for our
> use case.
> >>
> >> Good community support, backed by Facebook.
> >>
> >> Clearly, we can't use Docusaurus. I took a look at Hexo and it had
> similar problems and has weak documentation. Similar goes for Docsify too.
> It doesn't have variables and weak templating and I also found its
> documentation less friendly. It can't be used for our requirements.
> >>
> >> This again puts me in favor of HUGO.
> >>
> >> Do you have any other suggestions?
> >>
> >>
> >> Thanks for the research, feel free to look at others or other setups
> that may inspire implementation.
> >>
> >>
> >>>
> >>> I’ve left some more comments below.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks
> >>> Justin
> >>>
> >>> On Mar 8, 2020, at 1:16 AM, Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Hi Justin,
> >>>
> >>> I just got a reply from the 11ty team on the issue that I opened. 11ty
> has directory specific data files that can be used to define config to be
> shared to all the lower levels. The major downside of this is that the
> directory specific data file needs to be placed in the directory itself.
> Therefore, the data file will be directly in between the content files.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> You say that the data file can define configuration that can be shared
> by lower levels. So you could have two levels of directories, one that
> contains the data file and a directory of all the docs. In that way you
> wouldn’t haven’t worry about mixing them together. But I’d have to see how
> this looks in a more concrete example.
> >>
> >>
> >> If I am getting it the right way, you are planning to have a single
> data file. Yes, that would then nullify the point since we won't be
> concerned with the mixing of just one data file. But in case of multiple
> data files, say we want to customize some folders that should be different
> from the other folders at the same level, then we would need different data
> files in both the folders, and that's the kind of mixing that I'm concerned
> with.
> >>
> >>
> >> I was suggesting something like
> >>
> >> - Tutorials/
> >> - data file
> >> - pages/
> >> - tutorial_example.md
> >> - API
> >> - data file
> >> - pages/
> >> - framework_api.md
> >>
> >> I’m not exactly sure what our needs would be in terms of configuration
> in these files, do we actually need one per document file, one per section,
> or just one overall. The above example assumes one per section.
> >
> >
> > Currently, we would need one configuration file per version. There are
> three things that would be different on each page - the title, GitHub edit
> link, and the version. This information would be normally provided via the
> front-matter of the page but in our case, this can be provided in a data
> file (or a shared template). The title and the GitHub link can be generated
> from the name of the file using a variable but the version needs to be
> provided as a tag. So this tag would need to be in the data file (or the
> shared template) of the directory that houses it. This means that there
> would be one data file per version and a global data file.
> >
> > The structure you laid out also does some mixing. The data file is
> inside the contents folder which would contain all the MD files. In HUGO
> this data file is totally outside of the contents folder. While this
> doesn't have any significant performance effects, it is mainly a
> convention-related issue. Because we would then be cloning the repo
> 'tagwise' inside these folders. So do we want the cloned part directly in
> between the SSG data files or do we want these two in separate folders, is
> a matter of convention and developer ease. I would personally prefer having
> these two separate. What is your take on this?
> >
> >
> > I guess this all depends on what the directory structure looks like in
> the SSG. It seems we might have directories for each tag/version and the
> file could be in there, or possibly we might b able to source the
> tag/version name from the path that the files are in.
>
>
> I favor the tag-wise directory structure since that would help in
> setting archetypes. I am not sure what do you mean by sourcing the tag
> name, we would still need to clone tag-wise to detect the tag/version
> name from the path, right? In that case, archetypes would do the
> trick.
> >
> >
> > Now that you mention the GitHub edit link, I don’t think tags are going
> to work. The tag is frozen, so to speak. We may need to use branches
> instead, or a combination of branches and tags. I don’t think it will
> change your workflow much, or at all, though.
>
>
> Yes, the tags are frozen, thanks for pointing that out. However, the
> tags and branches are inconsistent. The branches are 1.9.x, 2.x.x, and
> master, whereas the tags are v2.0.0 and v1.5.0. Also, would it be
> sensible to have a GitHub edit link for older versions? I saw the
> documentation for Angular and React, and both of them have their
> documentation for older versions snapshotted and do not edit them. The
> edit on GitHub button on the older versions' docs are either dead or
> point to the current branch of the docs. Therefore, I suggest that we
> follow the tag-wise classification since that is the most widely
> accepted format. What do you think?
> >
> >
> >>
> >>>
> >>> According to my plan, the content repo was to be cloned in the SSG
> repo, so if 11ty is to be used then after the cloning we would need to
> further copy the directory specific data files into respective folders to
> make them useful.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> I guess this should be counted as a downside for 11ty since this extra
> copying operation would require an extra script to maintain and would cause
> a closer coupling.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> You’d still need some sort of script to do the cloning, so not sure
> how much extra work it would be. Maybe I’m forgetting or missing something
> with how you were planning to do the clone.
> >>
> >>
> >> Ideally, there should be one script for one functionality, so therefore
> I was thinking of a different script. And moreover, by a script, I meant by
> the code - maintaining it would be an additional task irrespective of
> whether it is in a separate file or not. Since it couples the two repos
> very closely, the maintenance can be frequent. And yes, cloning would be
> done through a script.
> >>
> >>
> >> I think we talked about possibly having a config file in the document
> repo that defined the parts or organization. It could also be that they are
> organized in a specific way, example directories to categorize the
> contents. We’d just need to know how to parse or place these directories
> and not each individual file. In this case there is a contract on what the
> incoming directory structure is, or instructions on how to move from one to
> another. Something to think about.
> >
> >
> > I thought that we wanted to separate all SSG related data from the
> content repo - that would include the config file as well. And yes, we just
> need to decide on the directory structure and the content would be placed
> accordingly and the SSG can then render the content.
> >
> >
> > The config file I meant here is something that would define the
> structure of the content repo. The SSG repo would use this to know what
> parts are what. It wouldn’t be something particular to a specific SSG,
> there would need to be something in the SSG repo that translated it to it’s
> own information. But having a consistent directory structure could possibly
> be used in place of such a file.
>
>
> The structure of the content repo would be determined by the way the
> data files (archetypes) are stored. The directory hierarchy of the doc
> files would be the same as I pointed out, and the other files would be
> re-organized. I don't think there is a feature such as a config to
> determine the directory structure. The directory structure needs to be
> consistent with the config of the SSG because the theme and the
> archetypes will be valid on a content structure that is similar to
> itself. Please correct me if I got you wrong.
> >
> > The directory structure of the contents (src/documents) need not be
> changed except for the images directory which would be moved to the static/
> or as a page resource if it needs some processing (one more point where
> HUGO beats 11ty since 11ty doesn't have any image processing features).
> >
> > We want the documentation to be readable/previewable on GitHub. That
> means that the URLs (e.g. links between documents, images, etc) would need
> to work both on GitHub and in the SSG created site. This may involve some
> translation of these URLs. In the current site we do some of this
> translation for changing between .md and .html, for example.
>
>
> The images which don't need preprocessing (like resizing) can be
> served directly from the static directory by relative paths and
> through server URLs (docs). The relative path method doesn't give
> previews in GitHub, whereas the URL method should give since that
> doesn't have to do anything with the content management system of
> HUGO.
> >
> > The layout file in the layouts folder would be replaced by a template
> layout file that is provided by the SSG. In the case of HUGO, this can be
> achieved through themes, partials, and templates
> > The static folder would be placed in static/ in the project root.
> > I am not clear about what is the purpose of the ghpages-files directory.
> In the deploy section of the README, it says that we don't use GitHub pages
> to host. Then what is the use of this directory? Also, what service do we
> currently use to host the site?
> >
> > There is some legacy in that we had originally used ghpages to host the
> site, but moved to self hosting. We may move to a hosting service at some
> point (e.g. back to ghpages, netlify, etc.). We should investigate removing
> the ghpages-files directory.
> >
> >
> >>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> I am still inclined to HUGO because of our use case. Lesser coupling,
> faster build times (since there are multiple steps like dispatch and
> cloning and that would add to the build time) and a file structure
> convention are some features that outperform 11ty. Some star features of
> 11ty like multiple templates are not required by us since we use only MD
> files.
> >>>
> >>> What do you think?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Addressing some of the comments/questions from earlier in the thread.
> Not sure what the issue about Hugo being written in Go. Could you explain
> and expand on that one more.
> >>
> >>
> >> Being built in Go means it is deprived of the amazing features of JS.
> Most importantly, the features of node and NPM which have many useful
> packages. This has been the main concern of many developers.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Regarding flexibility. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. If we
> maintain consistency in our use and follow best practices, I don’t think it
> should be a matter for us and could mean that we can tailor it to our own
> needs. If you know of a specific issue that 11ty’s flexibility is causing,
> or could cause, it would be good to discuss it more.
> >>
> >>
> >> If we are sure of maintaining best practices then this won't be much of
> a problem. Actually, this was the case of AngularJS - it didn't have a
> 'conventional' way of doing things and this resulted in a number of bad
> practices. The new Angular then removed this by introducing a less flexible
> framework. We can overcome this by setting up our own conventions that
> would eliminate any bad practices that might pop up.
> >>
> >>
> >> A contributing guide and documentation on usage, best practices,
> conventions and etc. should be included with the project.
> >
> >
> > Yes, that would be very important in deciding and cementing the
> conventions.
> >>
> >>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Thanks
> >>> Yash
> >>>
> >>> On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 11:59 PM Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Hi Justin,
> >>>>
> >>>> I looked up 11ty more and found the following advantages over HUGO:
> >>>>
> >>>> 11ty (2017) is newer than HUGO (2013).
> >>>> 11ty is built using JavaScript whereas HUGO is built using Go. JS
> being a native web language won't ever lose support whereas Go being a
> third party might lose support.
> >>>> 11ty has more flexibility regarding file extensions. It works with
> formats other than MD as well.
> >>>> 11ty has a flexible file system. So we can build it right from the
> current file structure.
> >>>> I also liked the documentation of 11ty compared to the one by HUGO.
> >>>>
> >>>> But there is a major downside that since 11ty uses a flexible
> directory structure, every page needs to have a front matter that specifies
> the template it needs to use. HUGO being strict about directory structure
> automates this process and is useful when we want to separate the content
> from the front matter.
> >>>>
> >>>> I found this issue to fulfill our use case but it was closed with a
> note stating it was solved in a version but I couldn't find any
> documentation regarding it. Therefore I opened an 'education' type issue to
> get their response.
> >>>>
> >>>> If this issue persists, then we might not be able to use 11ty for our
> purpose.
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks
> >>>> Yash
> >>>>
> >>>> On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 12:28 AM Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Hi Justin,
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Thanks for the reply. I have responded inline.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Thanks.
> >>>>> Yash
> >>>>>
> >>>>> On Thu, 5 Mar 2020, 7:02 pm Justin Obara, <obara.justin at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Hello Yash,
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Please see comments inline below.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Thanks
> >>>>>> Justin
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> On Mar 5, 2020, at 2:43 AM, Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Hi Justin,
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Just confirming whether you got my previous email. Is there
> something I should add or elaborate on?
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Thanks
> >>>>>> Yash
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> On Tue, Mar 3, 2020 at 3:14 AM Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> Hi Justin,
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> I will try to mark the issues on JIRA since it should have only
> legitimate issues.
> >>>>>>> Also, I tried out the repository communication. I created a
> dispatcher repo and added a workflow to send a dispatch to another consumer
> repo created by me. It worked perfectly and the repo was consuming the
> event.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> How is the consumer repo affected by forks of the dispatcher repo.
> That is, if I fork your dispatcher repo and push to it, will it send a
> dispatch event to your consumer repo and trigger an action?
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> It’s also worth investigating other methods that do not couple the
> repos together so closely.
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> No, the dispatch event does not work on forks. I forked the
> dispatcher repo here and pushed to the main branch. This failed to trigger
> the workflow in the main consumer repo (you can check here). Also forking
> the consumer repo won't have any downside since the dispatch event demands
> the name of the repo along with the owner so forks won't be affected.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Another method I initially thought before discovering repo
> dispatches was to have a special server for the sole purpose of sending and
> receiving events that would trigger builds. This would allow us to have
> custom features not limited by those offered by GitHub API. The downside is
> that we would need to maintain an additional repo and would not be able to
> access the community help that exists for GitHub's API. Also since out
> needs are satisfied by the GitHub's API, we won't need any other custom
> features than the ones already present.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> I think the design would not undergo much change. I saw the
> official documentation page of HUGO and they use pretty much similar design
> - a top nav, a side nav, and the main content.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> The source code is open-sourced here. I looked at the code and saw
> that the menu bar items were hard-coded in a site-wide config file here.
> The layout for the menu bars are placed in partials/ of the theme that
> HUGO's site uses.
> >>>>>>> To maintain the design of the current site, we would have to make
> a custom theme of our own (similar to the theme used by HUGO docs).
> >>>>>>> The structure of the files would also need to be changed
> accordingly. The md files or the content files would be put under content/
> and assets under static/.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> The repo would be essentially HUGO-oriented, with all the folder
> structure conforming to the one required by HUGO. In case of switching to
> another SSG, we would need to follow the folder structure and the
> conventional best practices followed by that particular SSG. We would again
> need a restructuring, although not this massive. Also, things like menu bar
> items which would be in the root config of HUGO would also be needed to
> migrate since the new SSG might have a different approach.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Regarding the folder structure, couldn’t we just copy/import the
> content to whichever location we wanted during that step of the workflow.
> Do we have to mirror it in the content repo?
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Yes, that's exactly what I am proposing. I plan to re-organize the
> folder structure and not mirror the current content to the new structure.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> Splitting the docs and the HUGO code would deprive of the many
> useful and core features of the tech. The front-matter or the meta-data per
> page is of great use and can be used to greatly customize and control the
> pages. Stripping HUGO of such important features could become a problem in
> the future or even during this project. For example, the GitHub link to
> edit the page is different on every page and can be stored in front-matter.
> Also, if we wanted to add an 'author' or 'last updated' information to the
> page, It would again be a front-matter thing.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Can this information be automatically generated on import of the
> content?
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> We can have a common front matter template for all files in a
> directory by the archetype feature of HUGO.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> Also, in case of switching SSG, the main part i.e. the MD doc
> files would be in the same hierarchy of contents. The only change that
> mostly happens in the names of the directories and some best practice
> conventions. Therefore, in my opinion, we should not split the codebase
> since it would be almost equal work switching in both cases but the
> one-repo approach gives many more additional features, and this advantage
> would be in other SSGs too.
> >>>>>>> I took a look at some other SSGs like Jekyll and 11ty. Most of my
> findings were the same as those by Sachin. One of the main drawbacks of
> Jekyll is build time increases exponentially with increase in repo size.
> 11ty has somewhat less community support.
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> For choosing an SSG, the choice should be between Jekyll and HUGO.
> Jekyll has a somewhat rigid structure whereas HUGO is flexible. I would
> recommend HUGO for the task.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Could you explain more about your recommendations, in particular
> against 11ty. Also, did you look at any others besides these three?
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I looked at Gatsby and Gridsome - the two other main SSGs - but they
> are framework dependent i.e. on React and Vue respectively and can be
> difficult for those who haven't worked in that area. SSGs like 11ty and
> HUGO are easy to learn and setup.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Right now, 11ty has lesser community support than HUGO. One pro of
> using 11ty is that it can be configured to run in the current directory
> structure. Although this can be tempting at first, in my personal
> experience, too much flexibility causes a lack of convention and leads to
> bad practices. This has been the case of AngularJS which being too flexible
> gave way to randomness in conventions. One other advantage is that it can
> handle more than just md files, but since all our documentation is in md
> format, this isn't of much concern.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Therefore I would recommend HUGO. However, I will try to research
> more on this topic and will update you if I find HUGO outperformed by
> another SSG.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> What are your opinions on this?
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> On Mon, Mar 2, 2020 at 6:27 PM Justin Obara <
> obara.justin at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Hi Yash,
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> It isn’t required to work on those issues. However, feel free to
> triage them and leave comments as necessary (e.g. if they are no longer
> applicable and should be closed).
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Other things you could look at in preparation for your proposal
> would be:
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> The cross repo event communication you mentioned
> >>>>>>>> The current structure, design, and etc.. how that might be
> affected by splitting things up
> >>>>>>>> Other static site generators, pros/cons for using which ones
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Also, regarding your comments about HUGO, if I’m understanding
> things correctly, HUGO’s speed benefits are at build/generation time, not
> necessarily when viewing the site.
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Feel free to ask other questions you may have.
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Thanks
> >>>>>>>> Justin
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> On Mar 1, 2020, at 1:21 AM, Yash Jipkate <yashjipkate at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Also, the issues in the JIRA tracker you shared are very old and
> some don't seem to apply now. Should I be working on them?
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> On Sat, Feb 29, 2020 at 5:32 PM Yash Jipkate <
> yashjipkate at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> Hi Justin,
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> Apologies for late reply, was busy with my exams, but they are
> gone for good now. I have addressed your comments below.
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 8:31 PM Justin Obara <
> obara.justin at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> On Feb 25, 2020, at 3:36 PM, Yash Jipkate <
> yashjipkate at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Hi Justin,
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Thanks for the reply. Apologies for the late response from my
> side as I am in the middle of my exams. But I'll try to address as much as
> I can. I have left them inline.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> On Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 6:58 AM Justin Obara <
> obara.justin at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Hi Yash,
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Thanks for your interest in this project. I’ve left some
> comments inline below.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Thanks
> >>>>>>>>>>> Justin
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> On Feb 24, 2020, at 4:29 PM, Yash Jipkate <
> yashjipkate at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Hi everyone,
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> I am Yash, and I need some discussion regarding the project
> "Refactor and Automating Infusion Documentation" and wanted to get your
> opinions on it.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> The HUGO code would be in a different repository; this would
> mean that the current repo would have to be cleaned of any rendering code,
> just .md and static files would remain. There is a way to clone another
> repo into a repo with the help of a script in the CI job.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Yes, ideally the content would be separate so that the Static
> Site Generator could be changed if needed, without the need to modify any
> of the content. Setting up a CI job, e.g. using GitHub Actions, could be
> one possible means of retrieving the content. Although this would also need
> to be easily testable for development so would likely involve some build
> task that could be run locally as well.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> By testable, do you mean testing the code changes in the HUGO
> repo or the changes in the docs repo? Does the docs repo need testing?
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> I’d say both. For example if you make some docs changes, you’ll
> want to make sure that it renders correctly, and links to other pages are
> functioning. That might involve running an instance of the Static Site
> Generator locally. Actually thinking through this process would be helpful
> too. It may affect how we make other decisions related to this project.
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> So I was thinking that we could have a script for local testing
> of the docs repo - something like `bash run test.sh` - which would use the
> config files of HUGO to run a local instance of docs. We can have those
> config files in a tests/ folder. HUGO can be configured to look for
> necessary files other than at the root level. We can pull the required
> files directly from the remote server rendering repo and delete them or add
> them to .gitignore to avoid getting those in the repo.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> The CI should trigger whenever there is a push to main docs
> repo; this can be achieved by broadcasting a repository dispatch event from
> the main docs repo.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Will another GitHub repo be able to consume the “repository
> dispatch event”?
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Yes, the dispatch event is a POST request sent to the repo we
> are targeting.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Could you like to the docs for the dispatch event both for
> sending and consuming it?
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> You can find them here and here.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> The cloning of the repo can be done tag-wise, i.e., instead of
> cloning the whole repo, cloning just a specific tag(s) would be done looped
> over all the available tags.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> That could work. Does that actually save complexity and time
> over checking out the whole repo and locally iterating over tags?
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> I guess it would take slightly more time than cloning the whole
> repo, but HUGO doesn't have git variables that could extract tags from it,
> that's why I came up with this solution.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> There are some libraries for indexing content and implementing
> the search functionality like hugo-lunr
> >>>>>>>>>>> The front matter - since it is required to not include it in
> the files of the main docs repo - can be made as layouts. The only needed
> front matter seems to be the title of the page and the GitHub link - both
> of which can be determined with the help of FIle Variables in HUGO.
> >>>>>>>>>>> The file structure would result as follows: All the .md
> documentation files would be having the same organization with their tags
> at the topmost level. In other words, the file structure for the .md files
> would be content -> <tag> -> <files-in-their =-original-structure>. The
> static files would be placed in static/ at the same level as 'content' as
> required by HUGO.
> >>>>>>>>>>> After cloning a tag, its contents would be copied to relevant
> directories, and then the clone would be deleted, and the process would be
> repeated for each tag, thus watching changes in each tag.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> These are some of my findings. What are your opinions? Should
> this be the way to do it? Or am I missing something that needs to be
> addressed?
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> I don’t know for sure if this will work or is the best
> solution, but it looks like a good starting point to continue to research
> and test from. You can also look into other static site generators if there
> are others that may satisfy the requirements better.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Okay, I'll take a look at some other site generators as well.
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> I think HUGO would be a good fit because of its extreme speed.
> In my opinion, a docs site should be as fast as possible since developers
> come there mostly when they are searching for something and no one wants a
> preloader to take most of their time. What do you think?
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> It would be great if I could get some insight into this. Also,
> it would be of great help if I get some guidance on how to start since the
> current docs repo has no standing issues on the tracker.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> You can find more issues in the JIRA issue tracker:
> https://issues.fluidproject.org/browse/FLUID-6160?jql=project%20%3D%20FLUID%20AND%20status%20in%20(Open%2C%20%22In%20Progress%22%2C%20Reopened)%20AND%20component%20%3D%20Website
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Oh, wasn't aware of this tracker, thanks for pointing out.
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> But you should also start by making sure you can get the
> current site up and running locally.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Do you mean using docpad? If yes, then I have already done that.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Yes that’s what I meant.
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> Thanks and Regards,
> >>>>>>>>>>> Yash Jipkate
> >>>>>>>>>>> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >>>>>>>>>>> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >>>>>>>>>>> India
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>> _______________________________________________________
> >>>>>>>>>>> fluid-work mailing list - fluid-work at lists.idrc.ocad.ca
> >>>>>>>>>>> To unsubscribe, change settings or access archives,
> >>>>>>>>>>> see https://lists.idrc.ocad.ca/mailman/listinfo/fluid-work
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>> Thanks and Regards,
> >>>>>>>>>> Yash Jipkate
> >>>>>>>>>> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >>>>>>>>>> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >>>>>>>>>> India
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>> Thanks and Regards,
> >>>>>>>>> Yash Jipkate
> >>>>>>>>> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >>>>>>>>> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >>>>>>>>> India
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>> Thanks and Regards,
> >>>>>>>> Yash Jipkate
> >>>>>>>> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >>>>>>>> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >>>>>>>> India
> >>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>>
> >>>>>>>
> >>>>>>> Thanks and Regards,
> >>>>>>> Yash Jipkate
> >>>>>>> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >>>>>>> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >>>>>>> India
> >>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Thanks and Regards,
> >>> Yash Jipkate
> >>> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >>> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >>> India
> >>>
> >>> <image.gif>
> >>>
> >>>
> >> <image.gif>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Thanks and Regards,
> >> Yash Jipkate
> >> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> >> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> >> India
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Thanks and Regards,
> > Yash Jipkate
> > Sophomore Undergraduate,
> > IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> > India
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> Thanks and Regards,
> Yash Jipkate
> Sophomore Undergraduate,
> IIT(BHU) Varanasi
> India
>


-- 
Thanks and Regards,
Yash Jipkate
Sophomore Undergraduate,
IIT(BHU) Varanasi
India
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