Engage idea

Ron Wakkary rwakkary at sfu.ca
Fri May 8 19:01:46 UTC 2009


Aaron,

I strongly agree with this approach. In our last project kurio <kurio.iat.sfu.ca> we came upon two notions: 1) narrativize the technology, e.g. we made devices that were playful and fit in with our narrative of lost time travelers; 2) simplify and distribute the functions across objects making them more playful, increasing opportunities for experimentation, and making each function more accessible and comprehensible. We had an underlying approach based in constructivist learning that helped articulate how these goals of narrative, simplicity, and experimentation enabled an outcome like learning.

We have also done some past work in how play (in our case play that was tangible and situated) is important in museums that relates to comfort, enjoyment and discovery.

I like as well the other post about visiting from a cat's perspective. The role of liminality (crossing a new boundary) and play is well elaborated in Genevieve Bell's museum as a cultural ecology: Bell, G. Making sense of museums: The museum as 'cultural ecology', Intel Labs, 2002, 1-17. She discusses three aspects to a museum visit: 1)liminality; 2)engagement; 3) sociality.

best,
Ron


----- "Jess Mitchell" <jess at jessmitchell.com> wrote:

> Keep it coming Aaron -- it's great to have your ideas on the list!
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> Best,
> Jess
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> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Jess Mitchell
> Boston, MA, USA
> Project Manager / Fluid Project
> jess at jessmitchell.com
> / w / 617.326.7753 / c / 919.599.5378
> 
> jabber: jessmitchell at gmail.com
> http://www.fluidproject.org
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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> On May 8, 2009, at 10:46 AM, Aaron Brown wrote:
> 
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> It seems to me that a good way to make people comfortable with new
> technology is to find a way for them to have fun with it. With that in
> mind...
> 
> Scavenger hunt.
> 
> For kids: A "Where in the world is Carmen San Diego" type of
> locatation-based trivia game.
> 
> This would work best in a larger museum, the more labyrinthine the
> better. There are a zillion places you can go with the basic idea,
> from
> advanced theme-based or riddle-based games to simpler games for kids.
> It could be a good way to encourage people into less-visited parts of
> a
> museum's collection.
> 
> - Aaron
> 
> P.S. I hope nobody minds too much that I'm lobbing these into your
> courtyard from the street, as it were. I was always that kid who
> wouldn't shut up in class.
> 
> --
> Aaron Brown :: aaron at thebrownproject.com :: www.thebrownproject.com
> 
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