Content management

Joseph Hardin hardin at umich.edu
Fri Sep 14 19:13:21 UTC 2007


I walk through the Ning screencasts at ning.com gives lots of ideas for drag
and drop and general social network user design and customization.  I
started with the first one at
http://networkcreators.ning.com/video/video?sort=mostRecent&page=2

Joseph

On 9/14/07, Daphne Ogle <daphne at media.berkeley.edu> wrote:
>
> Really interesting!
> This idea of a "what you see is what you get" interface is much needed in
> Sakai IMHO.   So, as I build my site, I am seeing it "become" right in front
> of my eyes.  Marc Brierley and I did some design work during the Course
> Management Project that would move us in this direction.  When it came time
> to implement because of resource and time constraints the project was scoped
> back.  The basic idea however was to allow a site owner to create their site
> in 2 clicks and then with the help of a "site creation checklist" on the
> home page, they could walk through the creation process across time (since
> faculty are busy and do this work in multiple sittings), collaboratively
> with co-instructors or teaching assistants (the checklist allowed them to
> see where they were in the setup process and what still needed be done) and
> it was moving toward being able to see the site grow as it was being built.
> This video also shows some of the possibilities that new technology like
> ajax allow us to include in our user experience.  The "reorganize" component
> moves us in this drag and drop direction.
>
> An additional thought on the video -- we should make this kind of
> flexibility available to the more advanced and innovative users.  We should
> also include some easy template-like functionality for users that just want
> to get a nice looking site up and running and will not spend the time
> customizing like the person in the video.  Many Sakai users will need help
> knowing "what to do next" as they setup their site (and I mean much more
> than choosing tools, like what are the implications of choosing certain
> tools and what's the best way to use certain tools together, etc.)  This
> problem of "I don't know what to do next" has already been a reoccurring
> pain point that comes up in the UX Walkthroughs.  In fact, I think we should
> be optimizing the user experience for the latter.  The patterns in needs,
> behaviors and capabilities we heard during the course management research in
> this regard were pretty amazing.   So let's create simple site creation
> templates and workflow based on various teaching and learning styles which
> we optimize for and then we have this more  "free form" site creation
> process like you see in the video.  And all of this includes the best kinds
> of interaction and takes full advantage of new web 2.0 behaviors,
> expectations and technologies --- ah, to dream!
>
> The real question in my mind is:  are we ready to stop being feature
> driven and instead be experience driven?  We ask for innovation but then
> when much time and design resource is spent to understand how we can
> innovatively better support our users, there hasn't been the commitment to
> spend the extra time to implement.  Rather, "we just need to get the
> functionality in" has been my experience.   This is a great way to stifle
> innovation IMHO.  With much work to do, why would I go the extra effort if
> history has proven it is all for not.
>
> -Daphne
>
>
> On Sep 14, 2007, at 6:57 AM, John Norman wrote:
>
> I saw an example of nicely useable software with *similarities* (and
> big differences) to the sort of thing Sakai does within a site. It
> illustrates the level of rethinking I think Sakai needs:
>
> fluid-work at fluidproject.org
>
> http://www.jivesoftware.com/products/clearspace/features/drag-drop-
> video.jsp
>
> John
>
> On 14 Sep 2007, at 14:11, Mark Norton wrote:
>
> Personally, I think that coming up with a defining term kinda
> misses the
> point.  As Daphne said, almost everything on a site in Sakai could be
> considered content of one kind or another.
>
> Rather than creating a sweeping definition, wouldn't we be better
> served
> by collecting the real needs of our users and documenting them? You
> might find that, after collecting requirements into a big unorganized
> pile, that pieces of the problem will emerge that fit together.
> Decomposition is essential, since the problem space is so large, but
> having a collection of requirements, pieces can be developed in the
> context of other things.
>
> Keep "content management" as a label and explore what it means.
> Ultimately, it's the work that matters, not what you call it.
>
> - Mark Norton
>
> PS.  There are lots of content management requirements already hanging
> around.  They just need to be pushed into Fluid's mindspace.
>
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>
>
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>
>
> Daphne Ogle
> Senior Interaction Designer
> University of California, Berkeley
> Educational Technology Services
> daphne at media.berkeley.edu
> cell (510)847-0308
>
>
>
>
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> fluid-work mailing list
> fluid-work at fluidproject.org
> http://fluidproject.org/mailman/listinfo/fluid-work
>
>


-- 
Joseph Hardin
School of Information
University of Michigan
Sakai Foundation
734-763-3266
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